How we Bicycle Tour with a Baby – some frequently asked questions.

Where are you riding?

We are riding from Barcelona, Spain to the Baltic Sea in Germany and then down to Berlin. Check out our rough route.

How long will this take?

We don’t really know but we estimate about 5 months.

How many kms in total?

5000km give or take 1000 🙂

How many kms do you do per day? 

40-60km depending on how evenly spaced towns are.  This is about 3-4 hours or riding – it is much slower with all our luggage and toddler.

It isn't always easy to manoeuvre the trailer around through the bike paths.

It isn’t always easy to manoeuvre the trailer around the bike paths.  We had to unhitch the trailer for this one – Amaya slept on!

Where do you stay?  

We mostly camp unless it is pouring with rain and then we might treat ourselves to a cheap hotel.  So we are obviously carrying sleeping bags, tent, cooker and sleeping mats.  We also use warmshowers.org, which is a fantastic hosting website for cycle tourers. Thanks to all the amazing people who have put us up!

Cool campground on el camino de Santiago in Spain

Cool campground on el camino de Santiago in Spain

She is a natural camper!

She is a natural camper!

This WAS a peaceful campground in Dinan, Brittany until we were invaded!  There were plenty of other spots they could have parked!

This WAS a peaceful campground in Dinan, Brittany until we were invaded! There were plenty of other spots they could have parked!

Where does Amaya sleep?

She sleeps on a sleeping mat next to us.

Amaya asleep

What do you do for food?  

We prepare our own.  We have a small cooker (Trangia that runs on metholayted spirits).  Our menu will adapt to whatever food is available. One of our go-to meals is pesto pasta with tuna fish, onion capsicum and zucchini (anything tastes great after a day of cycling!)

Amaya helping with the cooking!

Amaya helping with the cooking!

Sometimes supermarkets are difficult to find or worse, closed!  We rode up and down the street a few times before finding this one.

Sometimes supermarkets are difficult to find or worse, closed! We rode up and down the street a few times before finding this one.

Lunch stop

Lunch stop

Is it dangerous?  

Yes. Our biggest concern is being hit by a car or truck.  We just hope this doesn’t happen.  Accidents can happen anywhere even when one isn’t attempting something adventurous.

Do your bums get sore?

No.  We have buns of steel  – heh! No really, they don’t. We have Brooks saddles which are made of molded leather and are super comfortable. Our padded bike pants help too I’m sure. So while our legs hurt everyday – our bums are happy.

The first 400km were agony but they are a dream now!

The first 400km were agony but they are a dream now!

What kind of bikes are you riding?

We are riding custom built Surly bikes.  They are touring bikes that Michael has spent a lot of time getting just right for our journey.  The baby trailer is a Burley d”lite and is affectionally called “el cochecito magico” (magic buggy).

Shosh's Bike

Shosh’s Bike

How heavy is Mic’s bike with the trailer?

Including Amaya (but not including Mic) we estimate the whole setup to be 80kgs.  Not particularly easy up hills!

Mic's bike and el cochecito magico

Mic’s bike and el cochecito magico

Is it challenging with a 2 year old?

Yes, but it would be regardless of whether we were riding or not.  I think this question warrants an entire post.

What does Amaya do in the trailer?  

She sings songs, reads books, sleeps, plays with her toys and looks out the window.  She loves it!  Check out the clip below for a small insight…

If there are any other burning questions feel free to ask in the comments 🙂

Celebrating the number 2 in Brittany!

So we are sorry about our silence of recent date – we have been enjoying some amazing weather in Brittany and have been too busy cycling to blog.  Unfortunately this all came to an end about a week ago when the heavens opened and we (with the exception of Amaya) were significantly drenched.

Since the mechanical elephant of Nantes we followed a stunning canal deep into Brittany.  We passed castles built into cliff faces with witches hat turrets, enjoyed coffee in ancient town squares, camped in a forest where legends of King Arthur are told, scoffed crepes, wound our way along the flat tow path of the canal, passing river barges going up the locks, and cherishing the car free environment with the birds providing the soundtrack.

Impossibly beautiful cycling

Impossibly beautiful cycling

An amazing castle in a city called Joselyn along the Nantes-Brest canal.

An amazing castle in a city called Joselyn along the Nantes-Brest canal.

Amaya continued her passion for graffiti along the canal

Amaya continued her passion for graffiti along the canal

We had both been anticipating this section of our journey and it didn’t disappoint – this is France at its best.  It has been one of those experiences where we wished we could somehow take away more than just our memories and a few photos.  If only there was some way of capturing those moments in a more substantial way and transporting them with us…

She is really burying her nose into that flower!

She is really burying her nose into that flower!

This was a cool campground in an old guys backyard - total cost of 3.80 Euros!

This was a cool campground in an old guys backyard – total cost of 3.80 Euros!

Meanwhile there have been a few causes for celebration: Amaya’s second two-year-old molar finally poked through, her age caught up to her teeth on the 15th, it has been two months on the road, we made it to Roscoff which marked the end of our 1300km cycle path that we had been following since entering France, and we passed 2000km!

Sometimes we even find it hard to believe that we have managed all of this through simple pedal power!  That we have actually transported ourselves from Barcelona to Brittany on bicycles!?!?!

Excited to have made it all the way to Roscoff on our 1300km cycle path.

Excited to have made it all the way to Roscoff on our 1300km cycle path.

Cycling through a beautiful forest on bike paths

Cycling through a beautiful forest on bike paths

We are now in St Malo where we are catching a ferry to Portsmouth and then visiting Jonny (Shoshanna’s brother) and Helen and their new baby, Henry in London.  We then make our way back onto the continent and meet up with my parents  and ride through Belgium and Holland for a few weeks and then up into Germany and the Baltic Sea and down to Berlin.  Fortunately there is a lot of cycling ahead of us.

Lighthouse St Malo

Cycling up from the small ferry into St Malo

Cycling up from the small ferry into St Malo

We played for hours on the beach with the fortified city of St Malo all around us.

We played for hours on the beach with the fortified city of St Malo all around us.

Les Machines de L’ile

Our journey reached 1500km as we rode into Nantes, which turned out to be a magnificent city.  It is the fifth largest in France with a thriving cultural and artistic vibe.  It is a bicycle friendly city where activists paint bike paths on roads if they don’t exist already.  We stayed with Romaric and his family which was a treat in itself, as Romaric is the manager of a beautiful botanic garden (Jardin des Plantes) and a keen carnivorous plant enthusiast.

A beautiful botanic garden

A beautiful botanic garden

Giant seat in Jardin de Plantes

Giant seat in Jardin de Plantes

Without doubt the highlight was “Les Machines de L’ile”, an impossibly fantastical creation of Jules Verne type creatures.  There is a Heron with an 8 metre wing span that flies and carries passengers, a larger than life study ant, carnivorous plants, and then there is the Great Elephant!  A monstrous mass of metal 3 times the size of an actual elephant.  Really it is something that needs to be experienced to comprehend – hopefully our amateur footage does some justice.

We were all pretty pumped about the elephant!

We were all pretty pumped about the elephant!

Mic kept a safe distance! Getting trampled would certainly end our bike tour!

Mic kept a safe distance! Getting trampled would certainly end our bike tour!

Riding the beast!

Riding the beast!

Standing atop!

Standing atop!

Don't worry she didn't really put her hand int!

Don’t worry she didn’t really put her hand in!

Machines Machines

The giant Heron.

The giant Heron.

Amaya was apprehensive at first but soon warmed to the beast and added it to her growing collection of amazing sights and endless possibilities.

It also turns out that Shoshanna is not the only person in France complaining about the weather.  It has been the wettest May on record and shows no real sign of giving way to sustained brilliant sunshine.  Please think of us as we inch our way into a very damp Brittany.  For the moment though we are enjoying the wonderful hospitality of Patrick and Patricia in their lovely old house along Le Canal de Nantes.

Shelter from the rain

Shelter from the rain

Enjoying a scrumptious breakfast with Patrick and Patricia.

Enjoying a scrumptious breakfast with Patrick and Patricia.

Rain

Having the time of my life!

Having the time of my life!

I’m a little embarrassed to admit that I’m a bit of a fair weathered cyclist, so when it starts to rain I tend to stop enjoying myself. Its been a personal project to over come this issue but after several years of counselling dedicated to the topic I can still only manage to keep a smile on my face for so long. Some cyclists love cycling in the rain. So they tell me. But I wonder if the weather we have been having lately would even wear down the hardiest of those rain dancing warriors. Its not so much the actual getting wet while you are on the bike (although having rain pouring off my helmet onto my face isn’t my favourite sensation in the world) its more the added level of difficulty the wet adds to every aspect of the day. Packing up a tent while its raining is difficult if you want to keep the inside dry for the next night. Then what about lunch? If we didn’t have a toddler who likes to sleep during the time France likes to eat we might consider (on a particularly miserable day) splashing out on a restaurant meal and having a few hours of dry warmth. Instead we look for anywhere that will provide us a little shelter. Like a bus shelter with resident snails. It doesn’t make for the most entertaining of breaks but it keeps you out of the rain.

We don't tend to take photos when its raining but these inky clouds paint you the picture!

We don’t tend to take photos when its raining but these inky clouds paint you the picture!

OK, it hasn’t been THAT BAD, we have had a LOT of rain (almost everyday for the month of May) but most of it has been intermittent. We have only ridden in a constant downpour for 2 of those days. But its wearing us down, it makes camping not very fun, and to top it off the temperature range has been more of less between 2 and 12 degrees. With, might I add, not only rain but also wind, AND we have been hailed on – twice. Essentially we are riding through a bad Australian winter. Yuck.

Moody sky, not exactly a perfect day for the beach but we try to enjoy these small moments despite the weather

Not exactly a perfect day for the beach but we try to enjoy small breaks despite the weather

We are told this is very unusual weather for May in this part of the world – normally it is glorious. I’m not sure if that makes me feel better or worse. The crux of the matter is cycle touring has you completely exposed to the elements all day long. It’s an occupation that makes you vulnerable in many ways, and the bad weather has made us even more reliant on people’s kindness.

We were riding through the pine forest on an old railway track in a downpour when I was hit with excruciatingly painful stomach cramps. The sort of pain that makes you wonder if you need to go to hospital. There was nothing around so I had no choice but to ride on. Every time my legs hit the highest point of rotation the pain worsened forcing us to slow down. Now moving at 8km/hr we weren’t using enough energy to keep up the blood flow so we started to get cold. I kept looking at the ground wondering if all I could manage was to get off the bike, lie down on the grass beside the track and quietly… what? shake? shiver?… try to pass out so it would all go away? All I wanted to do was lie down so the pain would go but I had to ride on. Eventually we made it to a little town, we searched for a hotel, nothing. But it did have a very simple campground with a few sad looking caravans. I collapsed into a chair shaking, and crying, unable to bear the pain anymore. After establishing that I wasn’t about to die, the shocked camp ground owner quickly cleaned out one of her caravans and let us use it for no charge. She didn’t have to, but she did, and we will be eternally grateful. Yes, we are vulnerable, so when people are kind it means so much more.

The caravan that saved me. NOTE: A brief appearance of sunshine!

The caravan that saved me. NOTE: A brief appearance of sunshine!

We also meet the other sort of people who are unhelpful and thoughtless and then wish us a “bon voyage!” after telling us the camp ground we were relying on is closed, and the hotel no longer exists, and we have to ride to the NEXT town in the rain after a day that has already been too hard and too long with no guarantee of a place to sleep there either. Thanks, its currently a WONDERFUL journey (exasperated cheesy grin).

Thankfully this is a rarity, and as travellers discover most people are gems, with only a smattering of bad eggs in between. People are especially kind if they understand what you are doing isn’t a holiday, and the kindest of all on our trip thus far have been Bernard and Beatrice who we met in a small town in Spain. They invited us to stay with them in their small town of 26 people in a rural region of France. Their beautiful cedar home is situated amongst flower and vegetable gardens and filled with mosaics, paintings and other works of art all created by Bernard. Enthusiastic cooks and keen on us trying some of the local delicacies Bernard and Beatrice treated us to asparagus soufflé, chestnut soup, homemade Pineau (a French aperitif), and Beatrice’s homemade herbal liquor. All the vegetables came directly from the garden and we enjoyed ourselves planting potatoes, flowers and learning about the agriculture. Planing to stay only two nights, we ended up staying four – and it was tempting to establish some roots of our own and live the quiet life in this little paradise, dancing to local folk music and living off the land but alas the journey must go on.

Planting potatoes with Beatrice and Bernard

Planting potatoes

Planting flowers

Planting flowers

More planting

More planting

Amaya enjoying Bernards parents property where the Pineau grapes were picked and the wine was made

Amaya enjoying Bernards parent’s property where the Pineau grapes were picked and the wine was made

Cami the Cockatoo bit Amaya's finger. She loves telling the story!

Cami the Cockatoo bit Amaya’s finger. She loves telling the story!

Dinner party - Thanks for such a wonderful stay Bernard and Beatrice!

Dinner party – Thanks for such a wonderful stay Bernard and Beatrice!

And so we continue to limp our way up France slowly, slowly inching our way north. Riding for a few days then hiding as best we can from the cold, the wet and the wind for a few more. While we are waiting for the weather to improve I am continuing on my quest to stop my mood being directly linked to the rain. If the forecast is correct at least I will be happy tomorrow!

1000km and Counting

So we completed our first thousand kilometres a couple of days ago. Pre-Amaya this wouldn’t have been as noteworthy, but 1000km with a teething toddler in tow is a definite milestone. Thank you to everyone who has supported us so far! Thanks for reading our blog, for your encouragement and a massive thanks to those who have made a donation to Clinica Verde. We have raised close to $1000  (almost $1 per kilometre). This is money that has already made a difference to the lives of mothers and children in the Boaco region of Nicaragua.

If you would like to donate please click the button below:CV button to donate.001

  • $5 Helps provide clean water at the clinic
  • $10 Buys medication for a child  in need
  • $25 Supports 2 wellness visits for a child
  • $100 Provides prenatal care for 1 mother’s full pregnancy
  • $250 Supports a nurse for a month

Since our last post we have crossed into France and enjoyed about 350km of designated bicycle path. We are following a route called La Vélodyssée which follows the coast of France from the Spanish border for 1300km to Roskoff in Brittany.  It is an amazing piece of bicycle infrastructure – a refreshing change after Spain. The other refreshing change is how ubiquitous campgrounds are in France.  We no longer have to pre-think where we are going to stay each night – there is always a friendly campground to be found.

So while the weather has not been that great, the scenery has been stunning, and the bike paths smooth and flat.

Below is a small photo blog of what has been happening (including our first interview with Amaya):

Just finished lunch at a winner of a spot!

Just finished lunch at a winner of a spot!

Leaving our campground across a cute wooden bridge.

Leaving our campground across a cute wooden bridge.

We have been really enjoying the long sandy beaches!  The weather has been a bit suspect though.

We have been enjoying the long sandy beaches! The weather has been a bit suspect though.

Amaya love chickens!

Amaya loves chickens!

Typical lunch stop

Typical lunch stop

Beach

Dunes of Pylar were quite impressive!

The Dunes of Pilat were quite impressive!

Turned a corner down a side street and came across a circus! Luck!

Turned a corner down a side street and came across a circus! Luck!

Checking out the cool ports around the Bassin d' Archachon

Checking out the cool ports around the Bassin d’ Archachon

We were given this bottle of wine by the owner of the campground who was impressed with our "courage"

We were given this bottle of wine by the owner of the campground who was impressed with our “courage”

Haka in a Cider House

A few days ago we stopped in a small town called Umieta after spending much longer than excepted on the road.  Our intended destination was San Sebastian but the bicycle path we were following changed from a pleasant dirt track to one more suitable for mountain biking.  Amaya had endured 20km of pot holes filled with muddy water and we were exhausted after a couple of days of difficult mountain passes.  So in spite of being only 10km short of San Sebastian we hastily found a hotel.  The hotel owner was excited to hear Shoshanna was from New Zealand and called out to the neighbour who also happened to be a Kiwi.  Yos has lived in Umieta for the last 9 years with his wife, Maria, and lovely daughter, Intza.

Yos invited us to have lunch on Sunday in a Cider House.  We had no idea what an awesome experience this would be.   It is an amazing place, people eating big hunks of bloody meat, seated at long timber benches and yelling to make themselves heard.  The best part of it all is that cider is drunk directly from the 14000 litre barrels.  One simply holds ones glass under the tap and, presto, freshly pressed apple cider.

It was a feast of protein! Chorizo, fish omelete, massive steaks and sheep cheese and walnuts to finish.

It was a feast of protein! Chorizo, fish omelete, massive steaks and sheep cheese and walnuts to finish.

Amaya took an instant liking to Intza and they waltzed around the cider house like long lost friends.

Amaya took an instant liking to Intza and they waltzed around the cider house like long lost friends.

Walking between massive barrels of cider

Walking between massive barrels of cider

An apple pendulum!

An apple pendulum!

To add to the experience a semi professional rugby team from Barcelona was celebrating their win over San Sebastian.  There were a number of kiwis in the team who treated us to a display of the Haka.  A magical clash of cultures!

We left full of cider, protein and joy.  Not making it to San Sebastian after that nasty day of riding will be something we always remember with fondness.

When it all goes right!

It is a true statement that bicycle touring can produce some of the most amazing and memorable days, and at the same time inflict some of the most painful and miserable days imaginable.

Fortunately this post is about the former – in five months of riding I am sure we will have opportunity to report on the latter.

In Shoshanna’s last post she pleaded for the head winds to stop – and so they did – which was the beginning of our good fortune.  The day started with a flat tire – which is a bad omen for any ride – but once riding we enjoyed some nice shoulders, pleasant temperatures and a gentle breeze.  Amaya was singing all her favourite tunes as we rolled into a town called Esplus – which to me sounded more likely to be the name of a petrol station.  We did our usual thing and started cooking Amaya’s lunch in the town square while villagers stared at us.  Amaya and I played in the park at the adjacent school.  We then drank a sneaky coffee while waiting for the lunch to cook.  The bartender took a particular liking to Amaya and gifted her some particularly unhealthy potato crisps, which to the dismay of her Papá, she loved!

I would take a tractor lane over a bicycle lane any day.

I would take a tractor lane over a bicycle lane any day.

Amaya and I having a sneaky coffee - we are educating the Spanish about the joys of babycinos. It is always confusing for the bartender when I explain all I want is the froth.

Amaya and I having a sneaky coffee – we are educating the Spanish about the joys of babycinos. It is always confusing for the bartender when I explain all I want is the froth.

I got chatting with the ever friendly locals while Amaya grafitied the square with her chalk.  Lunch was ready, which we enjoyed on a grassy patch next to some teenagers smoking pot and trying to impress us with their gymnastic prowess (a potentially perilous combination).  So while Amaya enjoyed her first passive I wandered back to the bar and chatted some more.

Amanda (who is English but has lived in Spain since she was 19) invited us back to her property to see her horses.  We jumped at the opportunity.  Amaya was in her element – she didn’t know what to do first – there were dogs and chickens and roosters and a fun garden and fizzy drink!!  We sat and enjoyed chatting with Amanda while looking over the beautiful countryside out to the snowcapped Pyrenees.

Riding up Amanda's driveway with her awesome Spanish villa in the background.

Riding up Amanda’s driveway with her awesome Spanish villa in the background.

Amaya in her element!

Amaya in her element!

Amanda’s horses were beautiful and Amaya liked sitting on them (in retrospect).  It was time to go, much to Amaya’s dismay.   We said sad goodbyes to Amanda and were on our way again.  Encounters such as these make cycling worthwhile!

Amaya with Oro - an Andalusian thoroughbred

Amaya with Oro – an Andalusian thoroughbred

She was not super happy to be on the horse but she talked about it positively afterwards: "fun riding the horse!"

She was not super happy to be on the horse but she talked about it positively afterwards: “fun riding the horse!”

Ready to leave Amanda's villa.

Ready to leave Amanda’s villa.

To top the day off we landed an amazing hotel in un pueblito (little village) called Albalate de Cinca.  It was one of those moments where I checked the price a few times just to make sure it was true that we were getting 4 star accommodation for 1 star prices.

P.S. For the last three days of riding we have battled significant head winds.  Days like the one described above are great, but it is so hard to keep it in our heads that this is actually something we enjoy doing.  At the moment it is a grind.

P.P.S. We made the news in Nicaragua which has been quite motivating: http://www.nicaraguadispatch.com/news/2013/04/aussies-bike-europe-to-raise-funds-for-nica-health-clinic/7383

Crossing Catalonia

Riding westward across Catalonia into a westerly had me making some not very complex calculations: High levels of unfitness + insane headwinds + mostly uphill = LOTS OF PAIN. Multiply this with: Beautiful valley’s + medieval villages + time together as a family = worth it???

First day of serious riding with Montserrat in the background.

First day of serious riding with Montserrat in the background.

We are TRYING to take it easy. Ease our bodies into the trip. Obviously the headwinds have a different idea often forcing us to travel 10km/hr less than we would normally. This makes the short easy days we plan into WAY TOO LONG ones with the final 10km feeling like it might break our bodies. Adding to the issue is we are taking FOREVER to get going in the morning. Our systems need some time to be sorted out and refined. We are frustrated even though we know its a natural process that happens in a tour and soon we will be a well oiled machine, each item with its place, each team member with our own unspoken roles.  Despite all of these issues we are certainly pedalling past some pretty cool places:

Cool street in Cervera.

Cool street in Cervera.

Amaya checking out the arrow slits.

Amaya checking out the arrow slits.

The amazing town of Cervera. It even has its own spooky witches alley!

The amazing town of Cervera. It even has its own spooky witches alley!

Meanwhile, Amaya is being a little legend. While we are battling the wind, Amaya was being the best behaved little girl EVER. She loves it. She gets up, potters around the hotel room, eats breakfast, if she’s lucky a sneaky baby chino (yes – this is part of the reason we are late getting on the road!), gets spoiled and doted on by the proprietor, then into the magic buggy for some reading, snacks, and great views. A stop at a park for a play and lunch, then a nap while we do some good afternoon riding. Her life is a beach, two primary carers, predictable, and always with new and interesting experiences.

Amaya exploring during a break from riding.

Amaya exploring during a break from riding.

Thanks to using google maps on walking mode we encountered a little more adventure than we had bargained for. It instructed us to cycle down a dirt road into the wilderness. Scenic yes, but it made me feel a little insecure trusting google to get me OUT of the middle of nowhere to where we were planning on staying the night. The promised bridge that would take us back to civilisation and into our first campground turned out to be a dam wall. We had a few mini freak outs carrying Amaya in the magic buggy up a narrow stair case next to the enormous precipice so we could cross over. The bridge was made out of metal grate, LOOK DOWN Mic said, its an AMAZING drop! WAAAAAAAaaaa!

Going into the wilderness

Going into the wilderness

Having just made it up the precarious staircase we prepare to cross the dam(n) wall.

Having just made it up the precarious staircase we prepare to cross the dam(n) wall.

Goodbye Catalonia… Hello Aragon (Please don’t be so windy!)

Artés

While cycling the Danube River in 2008 we met Albert and Sandra. At the time they invited us to come and visit them in Catalonia, Spain. Four years on we took them up on their offer (which was still good). They live in Artés, a small village in the hills of Catalonia.

Luckily for us our arrival coincided with the annual fair. It is a big deal we are told in a village where not much else happens. The villages eagerly await the opportunity to check out the latest tractors and farming machinery while chugging down copious amounts of vino tinto and the odd coca de leche. There are also the obligatory tacky rides, which Amaya was very much into (and I thought she had taste!). In fact, being the little nerd that she is, she had read all about merry-go-rounds but never experienced their joys. I am not sure who enjoyed it more?

Weeeeeeeeeeeee

Weeeeeeeeeeeee

Definitely the spot for a group photo!

Definitely the spot for a group photo!

We moved through the Fair slowly, with Albert and Sandra stopping and speaking to what seemed like every second person. All wanted to see Baby Marc, Albert and Sandra’s baby boy. To the disappointment of Aunts, uncles, grandmothers, cousins once removed and friends of distant relatives, Marc slept on soundly in his baby carrier.

We were treated to some Catalonian specialties, including: Paella (not sure if it is strictly Catalonian) Pan con Tomate, Dried sausage amongst other delights, all washed down with home made wine thanks to Sandra’s father who harvests and makes over 1000 litres a year.

On our final day we were taken to two quaint villages an hours drive into the hills. The photos below barely do them justice. Gracias Albert, Sandra y Marc. Esperem veure’ls a Austràlia un dia proper. adéu.

Sandra, Marc and us with the Pyrenees in the background.

Sandra, Marc and us with the Pyrenees in the background.

Sandra and Shosh  - the entry to the town couldn't be more fun! Swinging bridge!

Sandra and Shosh – the entry to the town couldn’t be more fun! Swinging bridge!

Albert and Marc

Albert and Marc

Cobbled Streets

Amaya liked it so much she thought she would leave her mark.

Amaya liked it so much she thought she would leave her mark.

Amaya's summary: "Fun playing with Marc"

Amaya’s summary: “Fun playing with Marc”